Dorayaki pancakes

Dorayaki pancakes are a type of japanese pancakes, usually eaten as if they were filled or as if they were sandwiches filles with a sweet red bean paste or anko.

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Japanese dorayaki

They are known for being soft and fluffy, plus they actually look very pretty. Dorayaki are usually eaten filled with the red bean paste, which is sweet, but they can have several different fillings, such as nutella, jam, or even meringue. Some people even make them flavored, like oreo dorayaki or chocolate ones.

The key to making perfect looking dorayakis is having a good non-stick pan. It is also important using some oil, but removing the excess oil using a piece of kitchen paper. This way you will have some great looking dorayaki that are just perfect.

How to make Dorayaki

Dorayaki can be eaten for breakfast, as a snack, brunch or even for dessert. They are really easy to eat, as you just grab them with your hands and eat them like that.

An important step for this recipe, which you must always do, is letting the batter rest and cool in the fridge for 15 minutes so it is thicker. This is an important step, as it makes the dorayaki cook better and easier and have a better consistency.

Dorayaki are not your typical hot cakes or pancakes, they are more humid and stickier than a normal hot cake, because they call for honey, which gives them a great sticky feeling and a texture that is perfect to fill them and stack them together to make a sort of sandwich, as they stick together.

If you like this recipe, you have to go see our classic hot cakes or pancakes, you will totally love them.

Dorayaki pancakes
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Japanese
Servings: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 1/3 C (6.10 oz) (173 gr) all purpouse flour
  • 1 tsp (0.17 oz) (5 gr) baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 4 eggs, big
  • 3/4 C (5.30 oz) (150 gr) granulated white sugar
  • 2 tbsp (1 fl oz) (30 ml) honey
  • 1-2 tbsp (0.50-1 fl oz) (15-30 ml) water
  • 1 tsp (0.17 fl oz) (5 ml) vegetable oil
  • 15.80 oz (450 gr) red bean paste (anko), or another filling, nutella or jam, etc.
Instructions
  1. In a medium sized bowl, sift ntogether the flour along with the baking powder and salt.

  2. In a big bowl, beat the eggs, sugar and honey together using an electric mixer or a hand whisk for about 5 minutes until the mixture lightens in color and triples its size.

  3. Add the flour mixture into the eggs mixture in three separate additions. Beat for 30 seconds tops after each addition, just until the ingredients are integrated, not to overbeat.

  4. Cover the bowl with kitchen plastic wrap and refrigerate for 15 minutes until the mixture becomes a bit thicker.

  5. Take the batter out of the fridge, add in the water and mix using a hand whisk to make it a little runnier.

  6. Place a big pan on the stove over low-medium heat and wait for it to heat up. Take some kitchen paper with oil and spread the oil on the pan, making sure to remove the excess oil, this is to make dorayakis have an even color. Then, using a measuring cup add 3 tbsp of the batter to the oan and create 3.15 inches (8 cm) in diameter pancakes.

  7. When the surface of the pancake starts to form bubbles, turn over and cook on the other side. It will take about 1 minute and 15-30 seconds to cook on the first side and then 20-30 seconds to cook on the other side. Put the dorayaki on a plate and cover with a damp kitchen towel, so it doesn't dry up.

  8. Repeat the process with the rest of the batter to get 12 pancakes. You don't need to grease the pan again to keep cooking the pancakes.

  9. Once the dorayaki are ready, fill them by spreading some filling on the bottom of one of the pancakes and then place the other pancake on tpo of that, so they have thar particular shape and thickness. You should get 6 Dorayakis.

  10. To store them, wrap each dorayaki in kitchen plastic wrap and then store them in the fridge for up to 2 days, or in the freezer for up to 1 month.

Dorayaki recipe

Author: Andrea Gámez

Interior designer, Photographer, Food blogger and lover, painting entusiast and a sucker for art. / MEXICO

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