Chilean alfajores

Chilean alfajores are a different version of the classic alfajores that perhaps we all know, which are usually made in Argentina and other countries (if you know where, please comment below, we would like to know exactly where).

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This is the way alfajores are usually made in Chile. They are crispy alfajores and are thinner than the ones we know. They are filled, as every alfajor should be, with confectioner’s level dulce de leche, which is denser and thicker than usual dulce de leche.

A distinctive thing about Chilean alfajores is that they are usually sprinkled with a little powdered (confectioners) sugar on top, instead of using shredded dry coconut. Another point that I love is that they call for cognac to make the dough (the alcohol evaporates when baked) and when you eat them you are left with a little of that flavor, without tasting of alcohol, which is spectacular.

For Mexican readers around here: dulce de leche is something quite similar to our Mexican cajeta, with the big difference that dulce de leche is cow’s milk based, while cajeta is goat’s milk based. This plays a very important role in the difference in flavor that one and the other have.

These are easy alfajores to make and fairly quick. All you have to do is make the dough and bake. After that you just put a little dulce de leche to fill and assemble each alfajor, wonderful.

If you like this recipe, you have to go check out our chocolate alfajores. Or maybe you could check out our classic alfajores which are the ones normally made in Argentina and the ones we know best in Mexico, with some dried coconut or nuts on the outside.

Chilean alfajores
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
8 mins
Refrigeration time
30 mins
Total Time
53 mins
 
Course: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Argentinian
Servings: 20
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 C (7 oz) (200 gr) all purpouse flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp (0.50 fl oz) (15 ml) cognac
  • 10.50 oz (300 gr) dulce de leche (pastry type level)
  • Confecioners sugar (powdered)
Instructions
  1. Sift the flour into a large bowl and add the salt, egg yolks and cognac.

  2. Mix with a fork until a homogeneous dough is formed and finish integrating with your hands until the dough is smooth and soft. If the dough is too dry, add a little water and knead a little more.

  3. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 392º F (200°C) and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

  4. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and roll it out with a rolling pin on a floured surface until it is very thin (about 2mm). With a cookie cutter or a glass, cut circles of 2.30 inches (6 cm) in diameter.

  5. Place the alfajores on the baking sheet and bake at 392º F (200° C) for 8-10 minutes until lightly browned.

  6. Once out of the oven, let them cool down completely. Form the alfajores by joining two pieces with enough dulce de leche in the middle and pressing them together so that the filling is closer to the edges.

  7. Sprinkle the alfajores with some powdered sugar and let them rest at room temperature for 2 hours so that they stick together well before eating.